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HomeTiny HouseThey made a house out of an old retired airplane!

They made a house out of an old retired airplane!

JN and Stephanie have turned a decommissioned airplane into a unique living space in Alaska. The property not only features a flight school, but guests can also book the airplane house for an overnight stay. The airplane house boasts one-of-a-kind amenities such as a deck on the wing, the original cockpit with a flight simulator, and a functioning cargo door allowing for oversized luggage to be brought in.

The couple’s original plan was to build runways, hangers, and small cabins for students to stay in during flight training. However, during the construction process, JN had the idea to purchase a dried-in building like an aircraft and turn it into a house to save on construction costs. Little did they know that it would turn into a unique and amazing experience for their students and guests.

Photo : Tiny House Giant Journey (Youtube)

Alaska Airplane House

JN and Stephanie’s airplane house in Alaska is a one-of-a-kind accommodation that offers a unique experience to its guests. The property features a flight school and guests can book the airplane house to stay in overnight. The airplane house has a deck on the wing, the original cockpit with a flight simulator, and a functioning cargo door that allows guests to bring in their oversized luggage.

The airplane house was created when JN and Stephanie were looking for ways to run a flight school in Alaska and house their students nearby. They decided to buy a property of over 100 acres and build their own runways, hangars, and small cabins for their students. During the construction process, JN had the idea of buying an already dried-in building like an aircraft and turning it into a house. This would be cheaper in the end as they would not need to buy the materials and build from scratch.

The airplane house is made from decommissioned airplanes, a Boeing 727 and a DC9. These airplanes were bought for scrap metal at a cost of less than $100,000 each. However, the cost of transporting the airplanes to the property was much higher, costing up to $100,000 or more. JN and Stephanie did not disclose the exact cost of the project but estimated it to be over half a million dollars per aircraft.

To secure the airplane house to the ground, JN and Stephanie drove 7-inch piles down 20 feet into the ground and welded and bolted the airplane to these pipes. This ensures that the airplane is firmly attached to the ground and will not move during an earthquake or strong winds.

The airplane house has about 700 square feet of interior living space, with a mudroom, mechanical room, and a living area. The living area has the original cargo door, which still works, and leads to the deck on the wing. The cockpit is also part of the living area and has most of the original instrumentation and flight controls. JN and Stephanie plan to connect all of the flight controls to Microsoft flight simulator so that guests can sit in the cockpit and fly the airplane.

Overall, JN and Stephanie’s airplane house in Alaska is a unique and fascinating accommodation that offers guests an unforgettable experience.

Photo : FLY8MA.com Flight Training (Youtube)

Airplane House Origins

JN and Stephanie’s airplane house is a unique property located in Alaska that features a flight school and a one-of-a-kind overnight stay experience. The idea of turning an aircraft into a tiny home began as a way to house students nearby, but it quickly evolved into creating a unique and amazing experience for guests who come to stay and do flight tours or training on site.

The airplane house is built from decommissioned aircraft, including a Boeing 727 and a DC9 freighter, which were purchased for scrap metal and transported to the property. The transportation costs far outweigh the cost of the aircraft itself, with prices ranging from sub $100,000 to over $100,000 to get the aircraft on site where it’s needed.

To ensure the airplane house is secure and level, JN and Stephanie used a system of 7-inch piles driven 20 feet down into the ground to support the weight of the aircraft. They also welded and bolted the airplane to these pipes to ensure it’s firmly attached to the ground, even during an earthquake event or a 100 mph wind.

The airplane house features a functioning cargo door, allowing for oversized luggage to be brought in, a deck on the wing, and the original cockpit with a flight simulator. The cockpit still has most of the original instrumentation and flight controls, which will be connected to Microsoft flight simulator to allow guests to fly the airplane.

The living area of the airplane house is about 700 square feet and features a mechanical room inside the tail cone of the airplane that houses the boiler, domestic hot water heater, pressure tank for the well, and the main electrical panel box. The cargo door is also a cool feature, as it’s the original cargo door for the airplane and still works.

Overall, JN and Stephanie’s airplane house is a unique and amazing experience for guests who want to stay in a one-of-a-kind home and do flight tours or training on site.

Photo : FLY8MA.com Flight Training (Youtube)

Property Development

JN and Stephanie’s airplane house in Alaska is a unique property that features a flight school and offers guests the opportunity to stay overnight. The property has one-of-a-kind amenities, including a deck on the wing, the original cockpit with a flight simulator, and a functioning cargo door that allows for oversized luggage.

The idea of turning an aircraft into a tiny home came about by accident when JN and Stephanie were looking for ways to run a flight school and house students nearby. They purchased a property of over 100 acres to build their own runways, hangers, and small cabins for students to stay in. During the construction process, JN thought of buying an already dried-in building like an aircraft and turning it into a house to save costs.

JN and Stephanie purchased a Boeing 727 and a dc9 freighter that were decommissioned and turned them into housing. The cost of buying the hull of an airplane is usually in the sub $100,000 range, but the cost of transportation to get it to the desired location can be up to $100,000 or more. The total cost of duplicating the airplane house would be well over a half-million dollars, and by the time the driveway is put in, landscaping is done, and all furnishings are complete, it could cost between $6 to $800,000 per aircraft.

To ensure that the airplane house is firmly attached to the ground, JN and Stephanie drove 7-inch piles down 20 ft below grade and welded and bolted the airplane to these pipes. The airplane is also supported by four other 7-inch piles driven into the ground and two smaller 4.5-inch piles driven 20 ft down that are catching the wing supports.

The airplane house has about 700 ft of interior living space, including a mechanical room inside the tail cone of the airplane that houses the boiler, domestic hot water heater, pressure tank for the well, and the main circuit breaker electrical panel box. The cockpit of the dc6 airplane still has most of the original instrumentation, including the original flight controls, and will be connected to Microsoft flight simulator.

The cargo door of the airplane house is the original cargo door for the airplane and still works. It goes up when pressed, and guests can bring in their oversized luggage through it. The airplane house also has a mudroom and a living area with a functioning cargo door, which is the original cargo door for the airplane and still works.

Photo : Airbnb

Acquisition and Costs

JN and Stephanie’s airplane house is a unique property that features a flight school and allows guests to book the airplane house for an overnight stay. The property is situated on over 100 acres of land in Alaska and includes one-of-a-kind amenities such as a deck on the wing, the original cockpit with a flight simulator, and a functioning cargo door that allows for oversized luggage.

The idea of turning an aircraft into a tiny home began when JN and Stephanie were looking for ways to run a flight school in Alaska. They decided to build their own runways, hangers, and small cabins for students to stay in. During the construction process, JN had the idea to buy an already dried-in building like an aircraft and turn it into a house to save on costs.

The cost of acquiring an airplane for this purpose is relatively low, with the hull of an airplane being purchased for scrap metal at a sub $100,000 range. However, the cost of transportation to get the airplane to the desired location far outweighs the cost of the aircraft itself. JN estimates that it will cost up to $100,000 or more to transport the airplane to the property.

The cost of getting contractors and materials into the property is unknown to JN, but he estimates that to duplicate the airplane house, it would cost over half a million dollars. Once all the costs are tallied up, including the driveway, landscaping, and furnishings, JN believes that each aircraft house will cost between $600,000 to $800,000.

To ensure that the airplane house is stable, JN and Stephanie used a system of 7-inch piles driven 20 feet into the ground to support the weight of the airplane. The airplane is then welded and bolted to these pipes to prevent it from shifting during an earthquake or strong winds.

The airplane house features approximately 700 square feet of living space and includes a mechanical room in the tail cone that houses the boiler, domestic hot water heater, pressure tank for the well, and the main circuit breaker electrical panel box.

Overall, JN and Stephanie’s airplane house is a unique and innovative way to repurpose old aircraft and create one-of-a-kind living spaces.

Photo : Airbnb

Structural Support System

The airplane house owned by JN and Stephanie is a unique dwelling that requires an unconventional structural support system. The house is built on top of seven-inch piles that were driven down 20 feet into the ground below grade. These piles stick up anywhere from 4 to 7 feet above grade. The airplane was then wheeled back over top of the pipes and slowly dug away the dirt from the tires until the airplane settled all the way down onto the pipes. This helped to get the airplane perfectly level and ensure that it would not fly anymore.

To make sure that the airplane was firmly attached to the ground, it was welded and bolted to these pipes. This was done to prevent the airplane from moving around inside during an earthquake event or any sort of 100 mph wind, which happens about once a year in Alaska. The house is further supported by four other seven-inch piles driven into the ground, supporting a lot of the weight in the center, as well as two smaller 4 and 1/2 inch piles driven 20 feet down that are catching the wing supports.

This system allows the airplane to be secured to the ground, and at this point, there is no worry about the suspension collapsing or the tires going flat because even if that happened, it would not cause the airplane to go out of level. The support system also ensures that the airplane is not going to shift around on the pipes, making it feel like you were inside of a trailer or inside of an RV.

The mudroom in the airplane house is located up top, and the space below it is utilized for all of the Dry Goods. The airplane house is about 700 square feet of interior living space, and it has a mechanical room inside the tail cone of the airplane that houses the boiler, domestic hot water heater, pressure tank for the well, as well as the main circuit breaker electrical panel box.

The structural support system used in the airplane house is unique and innovative, ensuring that the house is firmly attached to the ground and does not move around during an earthquake or strong winds.

Photo : Airbnb

Interior Utilization

The airplane house owned by JN and Stephanie has been designed to offer a unique living experience to its guests. The house features a functioning cargo door that allows for oversized luggage to be brought in, a deck on the wing, and the original cockpit with a flight simulator. The living area is about 700 sq ft and is located in the back of the airplane. It features a mudroom that has been utilized to store dry goods, while the mechanical room inside the tail cone of the airplane houses the boiler, domestic hot water heater, pressure tank, and the main circuit breaker electrical panel box.

To ensure that the airplane house is firmly attached to the ground, JN and Stephanie have driven seven-inch piles down 20 ft into the ground below grade, and welded and bolted the airplane to these pipes. This ensures that the airplane house remains firmly attached to the ground even during an earthquake event or any sort of 100 mph wind. The suspension collapsing or the tires going flat will not cause the airplane house to go out of level as it is supported by these big pipes.

The airplane house is equipped with all the necessary amenities such as insulation, a boiler, and a domestic hot water heater to ensure that the guests are comfortable during their stay. The airplane house also features a functioning cockpit coffee station and a little beer fridge underneath it. The original flight controls, including the yolk, pedals, and throttles, have been retained, and will be connected to Microsoft flight simulator so that the guests can sit up in the airplane and actually fly it.

The cost of turning an airplane into a tiny home can be expensive. The hull of an airplane can be bought for scrap metal for under $100,000, but the transportation cost to get it on site where it needs to go can be up to $100,000 or more. The cost of getting contractors, materials, and all the necessary amenities can be over a half million dollars. By the time the driveway is put in, all the landscaping is done, and all the nice bedding and furnishings are complete, the cost can be pushed into the $6 to $800,000 range per aircraft.

Mechanical Room

The mechanical room is located inside the tail cone of the dc6 airplane house and serves as the hub for all the mechanical and electrical systems of the house. It houses the boiler, domestic hot water heater, pressure tank for the well, and the main circuit breaker electrical panel box.

To ensure that the airplane house is level and firmly attached to the ground, the team drove seven-inch piles down 20 feet below grade and welded and bolted the airplane to these pipes. This system supports the weight of the airplane and prevents it from shifting during an earthquake or high winds.

The mechanical room also features miles of wiring and technology from the 40s and 50s, which were used to make the airplane fly for six decades. The cockpit area, complete with original flight controls, is connected to Microsoft flight simulator, allowing guests to experience the thrill of flying the airplane.

The team also utilized the space below the mudroom to create a 700 square foot storage area for dry goods. With the mechanical room and other amenities, the airplane house offers a unique and comfortable living experience for guests.

Photo : Tiny House Giant Journey (Youtube)

Pilot Backgrounds

John and Stephanie, the owners of the Flight M Alpa Pilot Lodge in Alaska, have a background in aviation and flight training. They initially purchased a property of over 100 acres to build their own runways, hangers, and small cabins for students to stay in and train. During the construction process, John had the idea of purchasing a decommissioned airplane and turning it into a house to create a unique experience for their guests.

Their property features a flight school, and guests can book their airplane house to stay in overnight. The airplane house has one-of-a-kind amenities, including a deck on the wing, the original cockpit with a flight simulator, and a functioning cargo door that allows guests to bring in oversized luggage.

John and Stephanie have experience flying and running a flight school. Stephanie’s background in flying started about 12 years ago, doing her flight training in Michigan and eventually moving to Florida to open a flight school there. John, on the other hand, flew around with Stephanie and her airplane in Alaska and never went back to work.

The couple’s passion for aviation is evident in the way they’ve transformed decommissioned airplanes into unique homes for their guests. The cost of purchasing an airplane hull is typically in the sub $100,000 range, but the cost of transportation and getting contractors and materials to the site can quickly add up. John estimates that the cost of duplicating their airplane house would be well over a half-million dollars, including all of the landscaping, bedding, and furnishings.

To ensure that the airplane house is secure and level, John and Stephanie drove 7-inch piles down 20 feet into the ground below grade and welded and bolted the airplane to these pipes. They also have four other 7-inch piles supporting the weight in the center and two smaller 4.5-inch piles catching the wing supports. The airplane house has about 700 square feet of interior living space, including a mechanical room inside the tail cone of the airplane that houses the boiler, domestic hot water heater, pressure tank, and electrical panel box.

Overall, John and Stephanie’s background in aviation and flight training has allowed them to create a unique experience for their guests at the Flight M Alpa Pilot Lodge. Their passion for aviation and attention to detail can be seen in the airplane house’s amenities and construction.

Cockpit Conversion

JN and Stephanie’s airplane house in Alaska features a unique amenity – the original cockpit with a flight simulator. The cockpit has most of its original instrumentation and flight controls, including the yolk, pedals, and throttles. The flight simulator is connected to Microsoft Flight Simulator, allowing visitors to experience flying the airplane.

To ensure adequate insulation, the cockpit and other areas of the airplane house were spray foamed. The biggest concern for the airplane house is condensation, especially during the winter when temperatures outside can reach -10 to -20 degrees Celsius.

The cockpit also features a coffee station and a beer fridge. The original wiring and circuit breakers were left in place to showcase the technology that went into making the airplane fly for six decades.

Visitors can also access the cargo door, which is still functional. It allows for oversized luggage to be brought inside the airplane house.

The cost of purchasing an airplane hull is typically less than $100,000, but transportation costs can exceed that amount. The total cost to convert an airplane into a unique home is estimated to be over half a million dollars, including contractors, materials, and furnishings.

Overall, the cockpit conversion is a unique feature of JN and Stephanie’s airplane house, providing visitors with a one-of-a-kind experience.

Living Area Features

JN and Stephanie’s airplane house features a unique and one-of-a-kind living area that is sure to impress guests. The living area is located in the main cabin of the aircraft and spans approximately 700 square feet of interior living space.

One of the standout features of the living area is the original cargo door, which still functions and can be used to bring in oversized luggage or as a unique entrance. The living area also includes a mudroom located below the mudroom, which is used for storing dry goods.

The back of the airplane houses a mechanical room inside the tail cone, which includes a boiler, domestic hot water heater, pressure tank for the well, and the main circuit breaker electrical panel box. The living area also features a flight simulator, which is connected to the original flight controls and allows guests to experience the thrill of flying a commercial airplane.

To ensure adequate insulation, the entire living area was spray-foamed. The living area also includes a cockpit coffee station with a small beer fridge underneath, as well as the original circuit breakers, wiring, and miles of wiring that were in the airplane.

Overall, the living area of JN and Stephanie’s airplane house offers a unique and unforgettable experience for guests who are looking for something out of the ordinary.

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